Tag Archives: acupuncture

Meet Helena Barker – Acupuncture and Naturopathy, Specialising in Fertility and Pregnancy

Helena Barker

Tel: 086 8163130

http://helenabarker.com

 
My interest in Complementary Medicine stems from my childhood years and my mother’s influence as a practising Reflexologist, Acupuncturist and Reiki Healer. I have seen first-hand the power of complementary medicine and have used Natural therapies throughout my life to maintain wellness and vitality.

I graduated from The College of Naturopathic Medicine with a Diploma in Acupuncture and Naturopathy and received the prestigious Clinical Excellence Award for my outstanding Acupuncture work. I am a member of the Acupuncture Foundation Professional Association of Ireland (AFPA) and as such I fully comply with Association’s Code of Ethics and Best Practice.

I firmly believe in treating the ‘whole person’ by using a combination of natural healing techniques including nutrition/diet, lifestyle advice, flower remedies and tissue salts in conjunction with Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine.

I strongly feel that ‘wellness’ is not an endpoint, but is an ongoing relationship with your own body, ‘self’ and your environment – a natural balance.
I plan continuous development of my skills and knowledge through further training in Acupuncture and Natural Health. In particular I wish to travel to China to complete the Advanced Acupuncture Training at the International Acupuncture Centre in Beijing, a World Health Organisation collaborating centre for Traditional Chinese Medicine.

I specialize in women’s health, gynaecological problems, female and male fertility issues, IVF and pregnancy support.

Find out how I can help you.
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Cancer Care Support at Ananda Centre

Thank you to everyone who came to visit us at the PINK PICNIC in the Conyngham Arms Hotel, Slane last week. Trish and the gang organised a brilliant event. It was great to see familiar faces and make some new friends…and all for a great cause. We hope you enjoyed the night too.

A little info on what we do here in relation to Cancer Care Support.
I all look forward to meeting you again at the ANANDA CENTRE.
Have fun tomorrow everyone taking part in the Pink Ribbon Walk.

Services Available

Massage for People Living with Cancer:
This massage therapy deconstructs common myths about the use of massage in cancer treatment. It emphasizes that mechanical action such as massage does not break tumours open or cause them to spread. It focuses on relieving the discomfort of treatments such as chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. This type of massage therapy can be used in hospitals, in respite care, for the dying, and for exhausted caregivers. Each session is planned according to what treatment the person is undergoing at that time.
Contact Brenda: 085 1502378

Bio-Energy Therapy:
Bio-Energy healing works on treating blockages in the energy system which appear to be the cause of symptoms of ill-health, dis-ease, emotional issues etc. Bio-Energy uses in care may help to relieve symptoms of cancer or side effects of treatment such as anxiety, fatigue, pain, or nausea and vomiting. Bio-Energy therapy is said to promote relaxation and reduce stress. Some people with cancer have reported increased well-being, less pain and reduced nausea and vomiting after sessions. Bio-Energy therapy may be useful in reducing anxiety and increasing a sense of well-being.
Contact Evelyn: 086 8727472

Yoga Therapy:
Yoga in Cancer care is promoted as a natural way to help you relax and cope with stress, anxiety and depression. Generally, it can help to lift your mood and enhance well-being. Some people with cancer who have used yoga say that it helps calm their mind so that they can cope better with their cancer and its treatment. Others say that it helps to reduce symptoms and side effects such as pain, tiredness, sleep problems and depression.
Contact Brenda: 085 1502378

Reiki:
This Energy treatment may help some people to feel deeply relaxed, cope with difficult situations, relieve emotional stress or tension and improve overall wellbeing. Reiki is sometimes used in palliative care, especially in hospices.
Reiki may help to control side effects of cancer treatments, such as pain, anxiety and sickness. It is safe to have Reiki alongside your cancer treatment.
Contact Evelyn: 086 8727472, Ula: 086 0872526 or Brenda: 085 1502378

Acupuncture:
Acupuncture has received much attention as an adjunctive therapy in cancer treatments for its use in pain relief, reducing side effects, accelerating recovery and improving quality of life. A top recommendation for cancer pain is acupuncture. Acupuncture has its origins in Traditional Chinese Medicine and is based on the theory that one can regulate the flow of “Qi” or vital energy, by stimulation of certain points of the body with needles.
Contact Helena: 086 8163130

Reflexology:
Reflexology is a gentle, supporting, non-invasive wellness therapy that is used widely to support people who are living with cancer, who are undergoing various medical interventions and surgery or are involved palliative care/end of life situations. Reflexology uses pressure points on the hands and feet to stimulate specific parts of the body to help bring about homeostasis (balance). Many hospices and cancer units in hospitals offer reflexology as one of many complementary therapies to support a person on their journey with cancer.
Contact Ula: 086 0872526

Naturopathy:
Naturopathic medicine focuses on health rather than sickness and uses “natural” approaches to healing. Using different methods it is helpful for pain relief and the side effects of medicine and treatments.
Contact Helena: 086 8163130

Please contact us here in ANANDA CENTRE if you have any questions on the above therapies. It is important to tell your doctor about any wellness therapy that you use. Then your doctor will always have the full picture about your care and treatment.
www.anandacentre.com
anandacentre@gmail.com

Mind-Body Program Increases Pregnancy Rates in IVF Treatment

Study suggests stress and outcome may be related

BOSTON – There is no doubt that undergoing infertility treatment is stressful, with high rates of anxiety and depression reported by many patients. Mind-body therapies designed to help women reduce stress earlier in the treatment process result in higher pregnancy rates, but little is known specifically about the impact of these therapies on women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF).

A new study published June 1 in Fertility and Sterility, a publication of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine, shows that women who participate in a mind-body program for stress reduction while undergoing IVF treatment have a significantly higher pregnancy rate than those who do not (52 percent versus 20 percent).

“The intersection of stress and fertility is a controversial one, but we do know that stress can reduce the probability of conception,” said principal investigator Alice Domar, Ph.D, OB/GYN, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and executive director of the Domar Center for Mind/Body Health at Boston IVF.

In 1987, Domar introduced the Mind/Body Program for Infertility at the BIDMC main campus in Boston, later moving it to Boston IVF in Waltham in 2002. The goal of the program is to help couples learn effective relaxation and stress management strategies while attempting to conceive. The 10-week stress management program focuses on “cognitive behavior therapy, relaxation training, negative health behavior modification and social support components.”

To study the effects of the mind-body program on IVF pregnancy outcomes, Domar’s team approached women who were about to begin treatment at Boston IVF and who met the study criteria: 

40 years or younger with normal hormonal levels. None of the participants had previously participated in a mind-body group.

Participants were randomized into a study group that entered the Mind/Body Program for Infertility or a control group who received no mind/body intervention. All patients underwent IVF treatment. Domar tracked the groups through two IVF cycles.

In the first cycle, there was no difference in conception rates between the study group and the control group. “We noticed that only half of the study group had begun the Mind/Body Program and those who had started the program were only a couple of sessions in,” said Domar. “This seemed to rule out the possibility of a placebo affect. The mere suggestion of help with stress, it seems, does not increase the pregnancy rate.”

In the second cycle, the majority of the patients in the study group had at least five sessions under their belts. “By that point, they had acquired some real life skills to deal with their stress,” said Domar. “And that’s when we saw the significant increase in pregnancy rates.”

Domar found that 52 percent of the women participating in the Mind/Body Program for Infertility became pregnant compared with 20 percent of the control group participants, a statistically significant difference.

“The study supports the theory that psychological distress may be an important detriment to IVF outcome,” the authors write.

“We worked with a small group, about a 100 women total, so we’ll need to continue with a larger group of patients to see if the results bear out,” said Domar. “But there is a strong indication that stress levels and IVF outcomes are linked and that intervening with mind/body therapies can help.”